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November 1, 2017
2:00-3:00PM

STEM Career Pathways: Broadening Participation of Historically Underrepresented People

ACRP Professional Development Webinar November 1, 2017, at 2:00 pm EASTERN TIME

Online via GoToWebinar

 

Presenter: Dr. Mica Estrada

Date: November 1, 2017
Time: 2:00 pm EASTERN TIME

Free Member Registration

ACRP Non-Member Registration $30

African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans are historically underrepresented (HU) among Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) degree earners and career pathways.[1] Why do we stay and why do we go?  Viewed from a perspective of social influence, the pattern suggests that HU people do not become part of STEM communities at the same rate as non-HU students. Kelman’s (1958, 2006) tripartite integration model of social influence (TIMSI) describes how people orient to a social system and how this predicts their adherence to that group’s norms.  Dr. Estrada will talk about how this model can be used to understand how HU people orient to their discipline communities and how this relates to persistence in those career pathways. Specifically, Dr. Estrada’s talk will describe the findings from several of her longitudinal national studies of HU college students, and the integration of HU students into the STEM community by describing the growth (and non-growth) of science efficacy, identity and values. By tracking and examining psychosocial variables, we are better able to see what types of STEM training programs and mentorship are likely to result in students persisting in STEM career pathways.

[1] U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Summary File 1, tables PCT12H, PCT12I, PCT12J, PCT12K, PCT12L, PCT12M, PCT12N, and PCT12O; (Degrees) National Science Foundation, National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, special tabulations of U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, Completions Survey, 2001–10; and (Faculty) National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, Survey of Doctorate Recipients, 2008.


2017-11-01 14:00:00 2017-11-01 15:00:00 America/Detroit STEM Career Pathways: Broadening Participation of Historically Underrepresented People   Presenter: Dr. Mica Estrada Date: November 1, 2017Time: 2:00 pm EASTERN TIME Free Member Registration ACRP Non-Member Registration $30 African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans are historically underrepresented (HU) among Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) degree earners and career pathways.[1] Why do we stay and why do we go?  Viewed from a perspective of social influence, the pattern suggests that HU people do not become part of STEM communities at the same rate as non-HU students. Kelman’s (1958, 2006) tripartite integration model of social influence (TIMSI) describes how people orient to a social system and how this predicts their adherence to that group’s norms.  Dr. Estrada will talk about how this model can be used to understand how HU people orient to their discipline communities and how this relates to persistence in those career pathways. Specifically, Dr. Estrada’s talk will describe the findings from several of her longitudinal national studies of HU college students, and the integration of HU students into the STEM community by describing the growth (and non-growth) of science efficacy, identity and values. By tracking and examining psychosocial variables, we are better able to see what types of STEM training programs and mentorship are likely to result in students persisting in STEM career pathways. [1] U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Summary File 1, tables PCT12H, PCT12I, PCT12J, PCT12K, PCT12L, PCT12M, PCT12N, and PCT12O; (Degrees) National Science Foundation, National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics, special tabulations of U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, Completions Survey, 2001–10; and (Faculty) National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, Survey of Doctorate Recipients, 2008. Online via GoToWebinar